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Here’s a guide to understanding the classifications of violent crime

The American justice system classifies violent crimes depending on their nature and circumstances under which they were committed. This therefore means that these crimes tend to also carry different penalties.

In this article, we will look at some of the classifications of violent crimes.

1 Murder

In the American justice system, murder can either be the intentional or unintentional killing of a person. The murder will be classified and punished depending on the circumstances under which the perpetrator took the life of the victim.

Murder can be classified using the below common terms that you will hear in a court of law.

  1. Homicide, which refers to the causing of death of one or more persons by another person and this, is regardless of the circumstance under which it happened.
  2. First-degree murder, which refers to the intentional killing of a person or persons by another person.
  3. Second-degree murder, which refers to the unintentional killing of a person or persons by another person.
  4. Felony murder, which refers to the causing of death of a person or persons intentionally or unintentionally by another person as he or she engages in a crime under the category of felony which includes crimes such as kidnapping and robbery.
  5. Manslaughter, which refers to causing death of a person or persons by another person unintentionally as a result of reckless behavior.

2 Battery and Assault

In the American justice system, an intentional physical contact that is considered offensive and which results in an injury can be referred to as battery. Depending on the severity of the injuries caused, a person will be charged with battery if the injuries they cause are serious or charged with assault if the injuries caused are not too serious.

3 Rape and Sexual Assault

In the American justice system, forcibly engaging in sexual intercourse with a person without their explicit consent or with a person legally deemed as a minor is considered to be rape. Unsuccessfully attempting to do the same but resulting to injuries on the victim will be referred to as sexual assault.

It’s always a good idea to be familiar with these terms so that you can fully understand how the due process for each works.

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